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Are you really Cartier-Bresson?
Are you really Cartier-Bresson?
2018

It is a small project that should be considered more as a conceptual joke about photography and in-game photography. The project consists of several pictures and a small game where the pictures were taken.

 

The project raises the topics of time and moment in photography. Time has a direct connection to photography. Because of time, the picture exists: time is equal to the exposer process. And the control of the shutter speed is essential for creating the shot. We can somewhat say that time is controlled by photography/photographer. It’s no surprise that the topic of time throughout the history of photography has had almost theological connotations: in the 19th century in Europe photography was considered to be able to hold the soul of the dead man in this world. But the most famous example of such connotations is traced within the concept of the decisive moment. Till this day different interpretations of it are the leitmotif for many photographers. However, the ability to “capture the moment” is the side effect of the technical process behind photography.

 

The in-game photography has an interesting place in regard to the described above subject. The theme of time is almost blurred here. In in-game photography, time doesn’t take part in the technical creation process. So-called photo modes (these are the usual impersonation of in-game photography) with a few exceptions literally stop and sometimes even manipulate it to create the shot. In many ways, the time itself is rather fictitious within a videogame. Mostly, in-game photography does not deal with time (and light) but rather with the data.

 

“Are you really Cartier-Bresson?” speaks about the phenomenon of the moment in in-game photography. It’s a deliberately sloppy videogame. Here you are symbolically born as Henry Cartier-Bresson. You have three goals. Firstly, you need to “create the world”: by pressing a few buttons, you will witness the reconstructed events of one of the author’s work (the shot taken in Sifnos, Greece). Next, by pressing a button, you need to capture the decisive moment. And finally, you are appearing within the decisive moment. You need to create your perfect shot. You can make as many of those as you want.

 

By now the game launches only on Windows OS. All the shots are saved on the user’s computer outside the game. 

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